Free Downloadable Chart: Kitchen Math Made Simple

Free Downloadable Chart: Kitchen Math Made Simple

Download and print our free guide to easily convert difficult measurements in a snap.



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What do you do when your recipe calls for grams, but you only have measuring cups? How do you measure a pinch? Converting cooking measurements into ones that work with the measuring tools in your kitchen doesn’t have to be a challenge – just use our guide to make the math easy.

Here are some of the most common measurement conversions from metric to those typically used in the U.S.

Download and print our free conversion chart to keep in your kitchen.

Metric to Standard
5 ml = 1 teaspoon
15 ml = 1 tablespoon
30 ml = 1 fluid ounce
240 ml = 1 cup
1 liter = 34 fluid ounces
1 liter = 4.2 cups
1 gram = 0.035 ounce
100 grams = 3.5 ounces
500 grams = 1.10 pounds

Oven temperatures can be listed in either Fahrenheit or Celsius. Here are some of the most common conversions.

Celsius to Fahrenheit
150 C = 300 F
180 C = 350 F
190 C = 375 F
200 C = 400 F
220 C = 425 F
230 C = 450 F

Did you know that a stick of butter is 4 ounces, which is the same as 8 tablespoons or half a cup? Here are some other equivalents that might come in handy.

Cups to Tablespoons
1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons
1 cup = 16 tablespoons

Tip: A pinch is technically 1/8 of a teaspoon, but it is such a small measurement you may be better off going with the amount you can “pinch” between your fingers!

I also had the same results as mhdjl below (over 2 years ago); the document stopped printing after the 1st line about butter. Would be nice to have the entire conversion chart print.

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mhdjl

mhdjl

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I printed the conversion chart from the link. However, it stopped after the sentence about a stick of butter. While I know this stuff (we had Home Economics classes way back when), many young cooks do not have the benefit of being able to take a Home Economics class anymore, at least where I live.

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While your "kitchen math" on this page seem to be accurate, I believe you have some mistakes on the page that is linked here to the conversion chart has mistakes. Some poor young cook is going to have a problem! Thanks in advanced for fixing.

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