Make Your Own Tea Bags

Make Your Own Tea Bags

Check out this simple guide to homemade tea bags — plus a couple recipes to get started.


By Ashton Keefe

A cup of tea can sometimes cost the same as coffee in local shops, cafes and restaurants, but tea is simply herbs and hot water. Tea bags alone will hike up a grocery store visit. Not anymore! Here’s a simple guide to crafting your own versions with a couple recipes to get started.

What You’ll Need
Scissors
Coffee filter
Stapler*
1 tablespoon of tea
* The bags can also be sewn shut by stitching the edges with a piece of thread.

Instructions
1. Cut frilly edges off one coffee filter
2. Trim circle that remains into a square
3. Fold square in half
4. Staple or sew the sides leaving one edge open
5. Insert a tablespoon of tea
6. Seal with another couple staples

Tip: Make a quick tea diffuser if you’re short on time. Place loose tea in the center of a coffee filter, and secure the filter edges around the cup with twine or ribbon.

Batch Tip: To make a large quantity of hot tea, simply brew loose tea in a coffee maker like you would with coffee. Once you’ve got the hang of making your own tea bags, feel free to get creative — you might even come up with a special blend yourself! Try one of these out for starters:

Ginger Tea

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Ingredients (Makes 1 cup)
1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled
1 1/2 inches orange peel
1 pinch of turmeric

Instructions
1. Place ingredients in a homemade tea bag, then steep in hot water until desired strength is achieved.


Spiced Tea

Ingredients (Makes 1 cup)
1 nutmeg bulb
2 whole cloves
1 teaspoon of honey
1 cinnamon stick (for garnish)

Instructions
1. Place nutmeg and cloves in a homemade tea bag, then steep in hot water and honey until desired strength is achieved
2. Garnish with a cinnamon stick

Tip: Grow your own tea herbs with an indoor herbal tea garden!

What kind of tea are you planning to make? Or are you already a tea fanatic and making it already? Either way, let us know in the comments section below!



Ashton is the owner/executive chef of Ashton Keefe LLC Culinary Lifestyle Services, in New York City and a frequent recipe contributor and tester for O Magazine , Whole Foods Market Cooking and Everyday with Rachael Ray. Find her at her site Ashton Keefe.

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Noelle

Noelle

Reported

There are inexpensive metal tea infuser balls and spoons that hold loose tea very nicely. A tea spoon holds enough tea for a cup, a tea ball (usually on a little chain) works for a teapot. I even had a friend who collected antique tea spoons, used before paper teabags were invented!

  • Report it
Noelle

Noelle

Reported

There are inexpensive metal tea infuser balls and spoons that hold loose tea very nicely. A tea spoon holds enough tea for a cup, a tea ball (usually on a little chain) works for a teapot. I even had a friend who collected antique tea spoons, used before paper teabags were invented!

  • Report it

How about ... just use a reusable tea leaf holder (sold in most grocery stores or retail markets for 2 to 3 dollars!) And forget the cutting, stapling or stinging stuff...just use the tea holder and magically you get a fresh cup of tea each time

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