All About Bulbs

All About Bulbs

Here’s what you can expect from 5 commonly planted bulbs.



Imagine being able to enjoy a beautiful spring garden without having to spend all spring digging around the in the dirt!

OK. Admittedly, the alternative is to spend some time in autumn digging around the in the dirt, but planting bulbs is a great way to get a jump start on a beautiful spring garden.

General Bulb Planting Tips
Keep these tips in mind:

  • Plant in masses of colors for an effective display
  • Plant the tallest varieties toward the back and the shorter in the front
  • Bulbs should be planted at a depth three times as great as their height from tip to base
  • Bulbs aren’t choosy about soil as long as it’s not waterlogged. They can bloom in sunny to partly shady areas
  • After the flowering phase is over, trim off the dead flowers and fertilize with a 5-10-5 fertilizer about two inches from the base of the plant
  • Clear away foliage after it has lost all traces of green. Leave the green foliage because the bulb needs it to gather energy for next year’s blooms

Here are some specific varieties to consider when planting.

1. Daffodils
This hardy flower is a strong spring bloomer. Here are some of its popular varieties:

Fabric Care

$1.00

of reduction in store*

Coupon selected
Unselect coupon
To print your coupons, please use a computer connected to a printer.
Already Printed
  • King Alfred: the most common daffodil, grows 14-inches tall with sunny yellow blooms
  • Tête-à-Tête: grows to about 6-inches tall with a long yellow cup and petals that curve backward
  • Toto : grows 6- to 8-inches tall with white cups and up to 3 flowers per stem
  • Mount Hood : grows 14- to 22-inches tall with a large white trumpet
  • Pink Parasol: grows 18-inches tall with a stem topped with creamy petals and deeply ruffled coral-colored cups
  • Spellbinder: grows 16-inches tall with yellow petals and a greenish-yellow trumpet that matures into a creamy white color

2. Tulips
This beauty is offered in early-, mid- and late-season blooming varieties. It ranges in size from 6- to 28-inches tall with colors that include every shade of the rainbow. But its varieties tend to bloom differently. Here’s what you can expect:

  • Early Flowering (March to April): Greigii, Kaufmanniana, Fosteriana, Single Early and Double Early
  • Mid-season Flowering (April to May): Triumph, Parrot and Darwin Hybrid
  • Late Season Flowering (May): Rembrandt, Fringed, Viridiflora, Single Late and Double Late

3. Crocuses
When you see this start blooming, that’s your first clue that spring is just around the corner. The 4- to 6-inch flower can start blooming when there is snow still on the ground, and it’s perfect for borders or edging in a garden. It’s available in white, yellows, gold and shades of purple.

4. Hyacinth
This delightful blue, pink or white bell-shaped flower grows in clusters that can be 12- to 15-inches tall.

5. Allium
This carefree plant will tolerate poor garden soil, is deer-resistant and makes beautiful flower bouquets. It ranges in height from 8- to 48-inches tall and comes in shades of white, pink, blue and purple.

Complete your personal information

Please fill in the information marked with an asterisk to proceed; if you want to get tailored offers and content, don't forget to fill in the optional fields.

jtgarden

jtgarden

Reported

Thank you for my birthday wishes and the regrow ideas

  • Report it

Oh no what a shame! Perhaps these tips will help? https://www.pgeveryday.com/home-garden/gardening/article/outdoor-pest-prevention

  • Report it

Tulips are beautiful flowers but it is quite difficult to keep them growing in your garden. I had planted them in my garden a few years back but squirrels and rabbits ate all of it to the roots. After that I have never ever tried plant tulips again.

  • Report it