5 Questions that Could Save a Life

5 Questions that Could Save a Life

Discover the 5 questions you need to be asking about breast cancer.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, regardless of race or ethnicity. Among female Hispanics it is the most frequent cause of death. Taking this information into account, it is imperative that we protect our health, our bodies and that we ask these 5 valuable questions when we visit our doctors.

What are my specific risks factors?
Every woman is different. Only you and your doctor know what really is going on outside and inside your body. Risks factors may vary from the level of stress in your life (since it affects your immune system) to the kind of food you eat.

Do certain types of medications involve risk?
Read very carefully the secondary effects caused by the medications you take on a daily basis. There are many medications that while treating one area they may be affecting other systems in your body. If you don’t understand medical jargon then ask your doctor to explain in to you in the simplest way possible. There’s no shame in wanting answers that make sense to you.

When is the best time to start with the screenings?
If you are 20 to 39 years old, a doctor or a nurse should do a clinical breast cancer exam at least every 3 years. You should also be doing breast self-exams periodically in the shower or in front of a mirror. If you are 40 years old or older, a clinical breast exam should be done every year, plus periodical breast self-exams in the shower or in front of a mirror.


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Can I order a genetic testing?
As technology advances (and if you have a family history of breast cancer), you can ask your doctor to order this kind of testing. If you have a mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes then you can take preventive measures so the disease doesn’t catch you by surprise.

How can I improve my breasts’ health?
Women with lower levels of vitamin D are an easy target for this disease. Ask your doctor to check your levels of vitamin D in your blood.

Amigas, this is the time to be asking everything and anything we want to know about cancer. Each one of them is important. Remember, early detection is the key.

Share your own stories of early detection in the comments below.

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